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Friday, January 05, 2007

Separation Anxiety - Feds, Flyers and Ferries

I’ve often been accused of being a separatist but I don’t see it that way. Yes I believe a separate Newfoundland and Labrador is an option. Another option would be to become a part of Canada. That in itself is why I don’t see myself as a separatist. You see you can’t separate from something you’ve never been a part of.

Recently someone said to me, “It’s not so much that I want to get out of Canada, I’d like to get in first just to see what it’s all about.” For decades the needs of the province have been pushed aside in favor of the desires of larger centers such as Ontario, Quebec or even Nova Scotia. We have practically no representation in the Commons and have never had any on the Supreme Court. Our small population and massive geographical land mass make the equalization formula a joke when it comes to our ability to provide comparable services with other parts of the Country. Hell the largest population center in the province, the island of Newfoundland, isn’t even connected to Canada in any reasonable or workable fashion and it's this that brings me to the subject of today’s commentary, transportation links.

When the province supposedly entered Canada in 1949 we were assured of certain services. Two of those services identified in the Terms of Union were the Gander airport and the Gulf ferry service. Here we are, some 58 years later and what has happened to those key transportation links? Let me tell you.

Gander airport is on the brink of financial collapse. The federal government downloaded the service to local interests several years ago yet they continued to use the facility for their own purposes. The problem with that is we now find ourselves in a position where over 50% of the traffic going through that airport is related to the Canadian military. A military that refuses to pay for the service the airport provides. Has anyone ever tried to run a business where more than half of your customers refuse to pay for the services they receive? It just doesn’t work.

As for Marine Atlantic Ferry Services, the current ferry system is not recognized by Ottawa as an essential service. Tell that to residents and business interests on the island. The service is lackluster at best, prone to labor disputes, its capacity does not meet the needs of the public and the rates charged are not reflective of what the service actually is, an integral part of the Trans Canada Highway system.

According to a release issued by Hospitality Newfoundland and Labrador (HNL) just this month, the organization is very concerned with federal plans to increase the already unfair rates charged to ferry users. The rate increases will deter visitors from coming to the province, raise the cost of goods from the mainland and have a detrimental effect on business in general. Once again, we are becoming more and more isolated and disconnected from Canada, if that’s even possible.

I guess in some respects I am a separatist. I can certainly see the separation between our province and Canada clearly enough.

For decades there have been those in the province who have fought to get some sort of fixed link put in place between the island of Newfoundland and Labrador. At least this would provide an alternate route, a permanent method of getting to and from the island and allow for the people of the province to connect with one another more easily. All anyone has ever been told is that it would be far too expensive and is not feasible to construct a fixed link (bridge, tunnel, etc.), but why is that?

The province of PEI is much smaller in both size and population than the province of Newfoundland and Labrador yet the Confederation Bridge between that province with New Brunswick has been a reality for years now. The distance between the two is similar to the distance between the two parts of our province, yet there has never been a serious attempt to bring Newfoundland into the fold in the same way as PEI was.

Consider as well the plans now being made by Transport Canada to hike fairs on the ferry service to Newfoundland. A service that so many depend upon. According to Hospitality Newfoundland and Labrador, the average rate of user paid costs for similar services throughout Canada is 46%. This means that users of ferries, in BC for example, would pay about 46% of the actual cost of the service. By comparison, users of the Confederation Bridge to PEI pay only 32% of the costs while those using the ferry to and from Newfoundland pay a whopping 57% of the cost, far beyond the national average and nearly double that of the Confedration Bridge. This is before the proposed increases are put into effect this year.

Welcome to Canada folks. Like I said, you can call me a separatist if you want but it’s pretty tough to separate from something you’ve never been allowed to become a part of in the first place.

88 comments:

Anonymous said...

Semantics dude.

Anonymous said...

Have you ever been to PEI? The waters are infinitely more temperate there and it's also much shallower and it’s a lot more temperate, not tropical, but if you’ve ever spent any time swimming there and digging for clams off the sand dunes at high tide it’s a lot more pleasant than the northern peninsula.

On top of that you have to add on an extra 6 kilometers to the distance to the logistics of the bridge given the 18 KM to which the straight of bell isle runs at it’s narrowest. This may not seem like much but the Confederation Bridge is not an engineering marvel by osmosis (which my father oversaw) it had to withstand the marginal hostility of ice covered water in the area. It can be done in here but the feasibility does have huddles which must be acknowledged and there are numerous differences to the nature of the two areas. I doubt malice has anything to do with it.

WJM said...

When the province supposedly entered Canada in 1949 we were assured of certain services. Two of those services identified in the Terms of Union were the Gander airport and the Gulf ferry service.

The relevant Terms of Union are:

31. At the date of Union, or as soon thereafter as practicable, Canada will take over the following services and will as from the date of Union relieve the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador of the public costs incurred in respect of each service taken over, namely,

...

(d) civil aviation, including Gander Airport;

32. (1) Canada will maintain in accordance with the traffic offering a freight and passenger steamship service between North Sydney and Port aux Basques, which, on completion of a motor highway between Corner Brook and Port aux Basques, will include suitable provision for the carriage of motor vehicles.

How have either of these terms been breache?

The province of PEI is much smaller in both size and population than the province of Newfoundland and Labrador

The fact that PEI is smaller in size helps the business case for a fixed link there, and the fact that Newfoundland is bigger, hurts.

A bridge to PEI is, as a matter of economic geography, going to dominate transport on and off the island.

A fixed link to Newfoundland is less well-placed to do so, given that that island is so much larger, its centre of population is so far away from the proposed fixed link point, and that there are still, and would continue to be, other routes to and from that island (private shipping, Gulf ferry, air) that a fixed link can't compete with.

yet the Confederation Bridge between that province with New Brunswick has been a reality for years now.

Yes, because private companies pitched the government on it, and when a call for expressions of interest went out, there were some.

In Newfoundland, the word "private" is like garlic to a vampire, and the economics simply aren't there.

The distance between the two is similar to the distance between the two parts of our province,

Wrong.

The Northumberland Strait where the Confederation Bridge crosses it is 12.7 km wide. (The bridge itself is slightly longer.)

The Strait of Belle Isle at its narrowest point is 17.4 km, about 40% wider. More significantly though, it's much, much deeper: the deepest point of the Confederation Bridge crossing site is still only about half as shallow as the shallowest point on the Centre Bank in the Strait of Belle Isle, which is the shoalest part of the Straits other than the foreshore on the Newfoundland side.

It's also much icier, and unlike the Northumberland Strait, has icebergs to boot.

Most of all, the PEI bridge would never have been built if there were no highways crossing New Brunswick, or if New Brunswick were part of the province of PEI, yet PEI not only refused to put its own money into New Brunswick highways, it had a paranoid delusional fear about what might happen once there were highways linking New Brunswick to Quebec.

yet there has never been a serious attempt to bring Newfoundland into the fold in the same way as PEI was.

There have been numerous "attempts" over the years, dating back long before Confederation.

The most recent, and most serious, was initiated by Danny Williams himself, and it came back with the answer he wasn't looking for.

In any event, what could a fixed link do that a ferry system and private shipping can't?

WJM said...

I doubt malice has anything to do with it.

Anonymous, I guess you didn't get the memo: it is orthodoxy in Newfoundland that EVERYONE is out to get Newfoundland.

You question this orthodoxy at your peril. Be forwarned...

Anonymous said...

Well I live in the East End of St. John's and it's news to me.

Anonymous said...

What's this Higgins character's dayjob anyhow?

Anonymous said...

Re: comment Jan. 06 2007----You post a comment at 3:14 AM, and YOU are asking what someone elses day job is????? INCREDIBLE!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Rotoscoping burns midnight oil

Anonymous said...

It appears you may have burnt your brain as well, poor soul!! You be careful with that "midnight oil"!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Oh no!! Somebody has something (cofed. bridge)that Newfoundland doesn't!!

That must mean that the whole country is against you!! (again)

Anonymous said...

To Anon of January 08, 2007 8:44 AM: There are so many things that other provinces have that Newfoundland and Labrador do not have, because of the unfair treatment by Ottawa to Newfoundland and Labrador and the much fairer treatment to the other provinces, it would take too long to detail all of the items in this thread.

To list a few: The boat, that links Newfoundland and Labrador from Port aux Basques to North Sydney, Nova Scotia which is referred to as our Trans Canada Highway, is described as a cattle boat by some passengers. It costs Newfoundland and Labrador travellers to cross by boat much more of the burden. Newfoundland and Labrador travellers have to pay Ottawa 57 per cent of the total costs, while the travellers to Prince Edward Island only pay Ottawa 32 per cent of the total to get to their Island. The lack of high paying Federal jobs in this province, compared to the rest of the Canadian provinces, is a downright inequality. The lack of a full fledged Federal Military base in a province that contributes 10 per cent of the military personnel is very unfair. There are many bases in Canada, with some provinces benefiting from two or more bases. Military bases add hundreds of millions of dollars each year to a province that has one. The last count I heard of military personnel stationed in Newfoundland and Labrador was a count of 336 souls/personnel. That is very pathetic indeed, out of the 67,000 Canadian Military personnel in Canada. Our share should be 6,700 in an equal country. Further our resources, such as FISH, OIL, MINERALS and HYDROELECTRICITY are leaving this province in the raw state, most of them. If we were able to further process them, we would create a place as vibrant as Alberta, plus, of course, if we had our fair share of all the hand outs for Research and Development and the dollars that go into immigration for other provinces. If we had our fair share of the Federal government dollars and jobs that go along with it, we would rival any province in Canada. Anon - If it were only the Confederation Bridge that we were referring to, we would be laughing all the way to the bank.

Anonymous said...

BLAH BLAH....BLAH BLAH....BLAH BLAH....

Anonymous said...

Not very intelligent Anon of January 08, 2007 11:59 AM.

I am wondering if you listened to Michael Enright's show this past Sunday morning on CBC National Radio. His guest was Walter Benn Michaels and he talked about his book "The Trouble with Diversity: How We Learned to Love Identity and Ignore Inequality.

This book entails how we were treated in Newfoundland and Labrador by Canada.


Anon - It is getting to you that we aren't taking it anymore, is it? We have learned from our hard earned lessons and we shall move on keeping those hard earned lessons in mind and we will keep learning from our mistakes.

You people in the rest of Canada will not use us as the poorer cousins, who make you richer cousins feel better for the mere reason we are poorer and Ottawa/Canada has done it to us. Please read Mr. Walter Benn Michaels Book and listened to what he had to say to Michael Enright on Sunday morning it is all about keeping others poorer to make yourself feel better.

Patriot said...

To the anon who asked, "What's this Higgins character's dayjob anyhow?" I respond, what business is it of yours? You won't even identify yourself with a real name yet you seem to think that I should tell you what I do for a living. Now that's nerve.

I will tell you that I am not directly affiliated with any political party and I do not support any single political or business interest. My only interest is the well being of my province. Other than that what I do with my time or how I make a living is none of your concern.

Instead of telling you what I do for a living, I will ask you two questions in return. Why would you only sign on as anonymous and not give your real name, or at least a standard "handle" so people will know who they are talking with and secondly, why would it matter what I do for a living?

Are you one of those elitist types who thinks that unless you are of a certain social status you have not right to an opinion?

Pedestrian said...

Well it does provide context

Anonymous said...

To Anon who said BLAH BLAH....BLAH BLAH....BLAH BLAH.... Good Grief Anon what an idiotic statement. Why couldn't you have written a few words instead of an alien comment. Who knows what BLAH BLAH....BLAH BLAH....BLAH BLAH.... means? I have not the foggiest idea.

I can only deduce from your alien language that you Anon do not want to see the province of Newfoundland and Labrador move ahead within Canada, enjoying any of the Canadian goodies bestowed upon it, no different than the goodies theother 9 provinces have been the beneficiary of. It is hurtful to see people wishing Newfoundlanders and Labradorians and their province ill-will given our resources and our number one strategic location in Canada, the only other province with such a stategic locations is British Columbia.

My deducement of what you might be trying to convey through your simplistic alien language reminds me so much of the theme within Walter Benn Michaels Book titled The Trouble with Diversity: How We Learned to Love Identity and Ignore Inequality.

Please read it you/Anon who made the statement BLAH BLAH....BLAH BLAH....BLAH BLAH....

Maybe you will learn something about yourself.

WJM said...

To list a few: The boat, that links Newfoundland and Labrador from Port aux Basques to North Sydney, Nova Scotia which is referred to as our Trans Canada Highway, is described as a cattle boat by some passengers.

Will gladly trade you that "cattle boat" for the Sir Robert Bond AND the Apollo!

It costs Newfoundland and Labrador travellers to cross by boat much more of the burden. Newfoundland and Labrador travellers have to pay Ottawa 57 per cent of the total costs, while the travellers to Prince Edward Island only pay Ottawa 32 per cent of the total to get to their Island.

Who quantified these figures, when and how?

The lack of high paying Federal jobs in this province, compared to the rest of the Canadian provinces, is a downright inequality.

How so? In your response, be sure to make reference to the fact that this province has a larger share of the federal civil service than it does of the national population.

The lack of a full fledged Federal Military base in a province that contributes 10 per cent of the military personnel is very unfair.

Where is the "10 per cent" figure from, and what bearing should it have on the location of bases?

There are many bases in Canada, with some provinces benefiting from two or more bases.

"Canada" must really hate PEI, then, which hase none!

Our share should be 6,700 in an equal country.

Why "should" it be?

Further our resources, such as FISH, OIL, MINERALS and HYDROELECTRICITY are leaving this province in the raw state, most of them.

Whose fault is that? In your answer make reference to the fact that the province has sole jurisdiction over fish processing, terrestrial minerals, and hydro, and shared jurisdiction over offshore oil.

If we were able to further process them,

How are "we" not "able to further" do so? What's stopping "us"?

If we had our fair share of the Federal government dollars and jobs that go along with it,

What is a "fair share"? In your answer, make sure to reference the fact that the province receives far more in federal program spending, transfers to government, and transfers to persons, than the province generates in all federal taxes and revenues; and the fact that the province -- this must be repeated -- has a larger share of the federal civil service than of the national population.

WJM said...

Why would you only sign on as anonymous and not give your real name

Myles, maybe IT'S BECAUSE YOU ALLOW IT!!!!!!!!!!!

Seriously: change your posting settings.

WJM said...

It is hurtful to see people wishing Newfoundlanders and Labradorians and their province ill-will given our resources and our number one strategic location in Canada, the only other province with such a stategic locations is British Columbia.

What is the nature of this "strategic location"?

How and why does British Columbia, alone among the other nine provinces, share in this characteristic?

Tiffany said...

A province that is not landlocked has a much better strategic location than one which is landlocked. In my opinion a province that is not landlocked can be an independent country with less effort. That is, of course, if the people of the province have the desires to be independent. Of course, it is not easy for a province to exit a country once in, since things become very complex and complicated, and as a result, there is more to getting out than getting in. The biggest worry would be how much of a price tag would Canada put on our heads for our exit? God only knows what Canada would ding us with.

WJM do you sometimes thread under Anon yourself? There are at least one thread, maybe two, three or even four under the pseudonym Anon on this blog, that I would question whether or not it is WJM. Of course, I will never get the answer to that question.

Tiffany said...

PATRIOT WE HAVE TO BE VIGILANT WITH THE OIL COMPANIES. SORRY IT DOES NOT RELATE DIRECTLY TO YOUR BLOG BUT IT DOES INDIRECTLY.

I listened to As It Happens on CBC National Radio tonight and one of the topics discussed was on Crude Designs: The rip-off of Iraq's oil wealth by PLATFORM publications and articles on oil in Iraq. I found the discussion very interesting, since the province of Newfoundland and Labrador also has oil and is trying to get a small stake into its reservoirs, but is having difficulty in doing so because of opposition from the large Oil Conglomerates.
Isn't it strange how these gluttons are ready for the picking in Iraq? The same strategy is being used by them in Newfoundland and Labrador. They have moved away now, waiting for this province to give up and give in. Premier Williams please do not do it.

I thought this would be an interesting read for you by Platform.

I HAVE PLATFORMS SITE WHERE YOU WILL FIND THIS ARTICLE POSTED BELOW, IT IS ARCHIVED ON THE INTERNET. YOU WILL NEED TO GO TO THE SITE TO GET THE WHOLE ARTICLE.





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Control of Iraq's future oil wealth is being handed to multinational oil companies through long-term contracts that will cost Iraq hundreds of billions of dollars.

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Anonymous said...

"You people in the rest of Canada will not use us as the poorer cousins, who make you richer cousins feel better for the mere reason we are poorer and Ottawa/Canada has done it to us."

I LIVE HERE you morons!! I am not someone from away who wants to see NL stay "down". I am a Newfoundlander who wants NL to stop whining and crying that everything is always someone else's fault!
As long as we have Ottawa and the rest of Canada as our scapegoats we can continue DOING NOTHING and telling ourselves that we tried. I'm sick of it, and I'm sick of seeing all the seperatist talk. Get real. We wouldn't last a year on our own and Canada as a country wouldn't suffer in the least. We need a provincial government that will stop getting bogged down by it's own petty scandals and publicity concerns and start working for the betterment of the province.
I'm tired of all this hot air that passes for action and am about to throw my hat into the ring for publice office. At least then I will have actually tried something.

Pedestrian said...

I'll enable your confirmation bias if you enable mine. :D

mt.pearligan said...

xpTo Anon and your comment: "We wouldn't last a year on our own".

Nice position you've taken there - we wouldn't survive on our own. So what you're saying is that we're DEPENDENT on Canada? We couldn't pay our bills outside of Canada - only within Canada could we take care of ourselves? How so? There are many other smaller countries with less resources and less people that are doing just fine - Iceland being a great example. Why can't we repeat our apparently "amazing success" WITHIN Canada outside of Canada? Just for curiosity's sake explain to me why we're so crippled and innately incapable of managing our own resources, economy social system etc? Why do we need Canadians to make things work for us?

Do you really think the provincial government is responsible for all of our problems such as the Federally mismanaged and destroyed fishery? What about the Federal government's lack of cooperation with the provincial government in putting in place fallow field legislation that would result in better return rates on future oil discoveries? Do you have any creative ways for us to look in the mirror and blame ourselves for that too?

I think your lack of confidence in this province's people is a shame and your faith in an indifferent, distant and clued-out federal government is totally bizarre. You should run for office - you'd probably find loads of company in government what with your disdain for Newfoundlanders and Labradorians and your lack of belief in their ability to take care of their own affairs.

Anonymous said...

Mt. Pearligan - I agree with what you said wholeheartedly. How unfortunate for us, should we have such a person, as the ANON above, who says he/she is going to run for politics in Newfoundland and Labrador? Things are bad now, but it will only go from bad to worse if this person keeps his/her ideologies.

Those whiners that Anon is referring to are instead lobbyists, who are trying to get their point across in a positive way. In the rest of Canada, should they not be fortunate enough to have politicians who are on the ball for economic development and the betterment of their society, such people are not called whiners but instead are referred to in a more positive light and they are referred to as 'LOBBYISTS' for change. Lobbyists are people who want change in their economic and everyday living standards. How dare you Anon to call these people whiners, these people who are lobbying for the betterment of all. It sickens me that we have such low life among us as to call these people whiners. I hope we have a force looking over us to guard such a person from running in our beloved province. It is frightening indeed.

WJM said...

A province that is not landlocked has a much better strategic location than one which is landlocked.

In that case, NL has the same "strategic location", no more, no less, as British Columbia... but also Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, PEI, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick.

There are only two landlocked provinces: Alberta and Saskatchewan.

WJM do you sometimes thread under Anon yourself?

Nope.

There are at least one thread, maybe two, three or even four under the pseudonym Anon on this blog, that I would question whether or not it is WJM. Of course, I will never get the answer to that question.

You would, if Myles would require log-ins and abolish anonymous and pseudonymous posting.

I am not afraid to sign my handle.

Patriot said...

Once again Wallace, I don't block anyone who has something to say, whether they feel comfortable making their name public or not, unless of they go outside the bounds of acceptable public language, swearing, etc. and this is only becuase this site is open to younger readers who do not need to be exposed to any more of that sort of language than many of them already are.

Free speach is more important to me than knowing who someone is so you can continue to ask me to block people as long as you like but it isn't going to happen. (My blog my rules, your blog your rules)

Anonymous said...

None of the other provinces with ocean frontage has the same exposure to the Ocean as does the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, except for British Columbia. Newfoundland and Labrador is on the extreme East coast of Canada. One of the advantages for being a nation is to have nobody else poised on one of your flanks. That is the attribute Newfoundland and Labrador and British Columbia possess. The province of Newfoundland and Labrador brought to Canada its entire East Coast periphery, included in the waters Newfoundland and Labrador brought into Canada is one of the most prolific fish nurseries in the World, the Grand Banks of Newfoundland and as we all know, vast Oil potential. Anyway that is what I have heard when Oil Analysts describe these waters off our shores, as it relates to Oil. These analysts describe it as an area with vast potential for more oil discoveries, far and beyond what has already been discovered and disclosed.

NL-ExPatriate said...

Anon January 09, 2007 11:27 PM

If you were a true NL'ian you would use your name and not hide behind anon.

For all we know you are a federalists and from Ontario who wants to keep the status Quo. Until you do show your true name I will assume you are exactly that.

Or are you like the rest of the fighting NL'ians afraid of the establishment due to it's incursion into every aspect of our lives through the welfare state of giving with one hand while taking with the other. Mail in rebate country is what we are with a strong concensus towards benefiting the rich.

I like my country but I love my province!

WJM said...

Once again Wallace, I don't block anyone who has something to say,

I'm not asking you to block anyone... just require that they sign in.

whether they feel comfortable making their name public or not,

They don't have to make their name public; all signing in would mean is that every anonymouse would have a discrete handle by which they would be known. They could sign in under the handle Homer Simpson if they want, just as long as they are the only registered Homer Simpson.

Free speach is more important to me than knowing who someone is

You don't need to know who they are, only that the person who posts as "Caspar" is the one and only person, and always the person, who posts as "Caspar". You don't need to know their true name, and it wouldn't be revealed.

so you can continue to ask me to block people as long as you like but it isn't going to happen.

I haven't asked you to block anyone, so stop arguing against strawmen.

WJM said...

None of the other provinces with ocean frontage has the same exposure to the Ocean as does the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, except for British Columbia.

What does "exposure to the Ocean" do for you?

Quebec has no exposure directly to the ocean, but it has had more shipping to and from than Newfoundland for the past 300 years.

Newfoundland and Labrador is on the extreme East coast of Canada. One of the advantages for being a nation is to have nobody else poised on one of your flanks. That is the attribute Newfoundland and Labrador and British Columbia possess.

Define "poised on one of your flanks".

These analysts describe it as an area with vast potential for more oil discoveries, far and beyond what has already been discovered and disclosed.

You can't feed yourself with "potential", vast or otherwise.

Anonymous said...

In my opinion the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador and British Columbia have the best strategic locations in Canada. You would have to have all your senses diable not to see that.

The Oil companies act like vultures. They try to weaken their prey, then they move in for the kill. I hope Premier Williams doesn't let the Oil Companies use that strategy on him and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Anonymous said...

It is not "potential" the oil is there. The oil companies upgrade the reserves from time to time. That is the way they operate. They know exactly what is there, but they are not going to give out all of their secrets up front. The Oil companies are too cunning to do such a thing.

NL-ExPatriate said...

This comment has been removed because it linked to malicious content. Learn more.

Anonymous said...

nl-expatriate - Great article - I selected the second paragraph and pasted it below. That paragraph says MUCH.





“Big oil and big government are not colluding to assure reasonable profitability and sustainability in the oil industry. They are colluding to protect the “right” to ever-growing exorbitant profits, and taxes, fiscal quarter after fiscal quarter, year in and year out. The premise of shortage of supply is, by any standard, a fallacy of staggering proportions and the propagation of this myth by producers and governments is a fraud on the body politic of criminal degree.”

~ “Power Play”

Anonymous said...

So you're a systems analyst and you appear quite genteel, I don’t get it, what's your issue then?

WJM said...

In my opinion the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador and British Columbia have the best strategic locations in Canada. You would have to have all your senses diable not to see that.

What makes their locations more "strategic" than other provinces?

Or, if you prefer, what makes those other provinces "less strategic"?

Tiffany said...

I read an article archived on the Canadian War Museun. The article talked about Newfoundland and Labrador as being a Garrison Country during the Second World War. The article talks about how on 8 September 1939 Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King told the Canadian House of Commons that the "integrity of Newfoundland and Labrador" were "essential to the security of Canada." After which Canada built Military bases and installations in Newfoundland and Labrador and the United States built three very large bases here. There were many installations by both countries. That is how strategicly important the province of Newfoundland and Labrador was to the well being of North America, and maybe, the World that was at war at the time.

After the Second World War was over and when everything was looking better well into the 1960s and 1970s that is when the Americans pulled out. And of course Canada pulled out and put their military resources into other parts of Canada, no doubt, because of the lobbying efforts of the other provinces. You see Military Operations are a boon to any area, such an industry brings great dollars and boosts the economy of the area that is the beneficiary.

Anonymous said...

And your point is??

Tiffany said...

My point Is:

Location! Location! Location!!! Strategic Indeed!

NL-ExPatriate said...

Fearless leader Stephen Harper like all of the fearless leaders before him considers NL apart of NB, NS, and PEI is why there isn't one operationally manned army, Navy, or Airforce base in NL.

"British Columbia is now the only region of the country without a regular army presence,"


http://www.cbc.ca/news/story/2005/12/28/harper-military051228.html

WJM said...

Location! Location! Location!!! Strategic Indeed!

Yes, very strategic when there is a war going on in Europe.

But then what?

WJM said...

apart

Please learn the difference between "apart" and "a part".

Anonymous said...

WJM of January 13, 2007 12:48 AM - How trivial? There are many simplistic mistakes in these blogs, and I have even found errors in articles printed in the Globe and Mail and the New York Times. I have edited articles in both of the above papers for pastime on many occasions and have found errors such as the one you just pointed out. Please do not be so childish. It displays your character and the reason we have to argue against you when we are at bat for our province.

Anonymous said...

WJM of January 13, 2007 12:48 AM who said "But then what:?

AAAGH WJM isn't the picture more clearly focused for you now?

You see in times of war when the danger is really there, it shows which province has the most strategic location. In the case of Canada it was Newfoundland and Labrador, since that is where some of the largest Military bases in the world were situated, if not the largest. The United States placed three of its largest military installations here and Canada put many installations here as well.

But, of course, when the danger abated, the lobbyists, who had wanted their backsides protected in time of war lobbied Ottawa for the bases to be put back into other parts of Canada to create better economies there.

The NOW province of Newfoundland and Labrador ( we weren't a province back in wartime) was used and abused in war, no differently than it is being used and abused now in peace time. The only difference in peace time is that our natural and human resources are being pillaged and used for economies in the rest of Canada and the world and not Newfoundland and Labrador.

Anonymous said...

*.*

Why are you not lobbying for the 650 military jobs for Goose Bay? You are a native born Labradorian, or are you not?

Is it because you are no different than the politicians who represent us? Are you more concerned about what you can garner personally for yourself by being quiet and acting counter to what the people want for your area? Are you afraid that you will jeopardize your own career if you ask for things Ottawa doesn’t want you to ask for, such as the resources that are going out of your area to be detained in Labrador to create vibrant economies in Labrador? And as result of not irritating Ottawa you will then instead create a good career and life for yourself, but not for the many that depend on you and the person for whom you are working for in Ottawa? We all know that the less selfish people who speak out for their constituents and their area are less likely to get promoted in Ottawa than the ones who stay quiet and toe the party line.


The problem with politicians and bureaucrats is that they are more concerned about amassing a fortune for themselves, than doing what is right for the electorate for whom they are representing.

WJM said...

I have even found errors in articles printed in the Globe and Mail and the New York Times.

So have I. But there's a big difference between a typo and someone who consistently uses the wrong word in the wrong place, as that poster does, over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over again with "apart".

It displays your character and the reason we have to argue against you when we are at bat for our province.

The constant misuse of "apart" shows a carelessness and sloppiness that casts doubt on the poster's underlying facts and arguments.

WJM said...

You see in times of war when the danger is really there, it shows which province has the most strategic location.

That depends on where in the world the war is, now, doesn't it?

In the case of Canada it was Newfoundland and Labrador, since that is where some of the largest Military bases in the world were situated, if not the largest.

I don't think any of them were even close to being in "world largest" category.

The United States placed three of its largest military installations here and Canada put many installations here as well.

"Three of its largest"... have you quantified this? How would Goose, Harmon, and Pepperell have compared to some of the massive bases on the US home soil?

But, of course, when the danger abated, the lobbyists, who had wanted their backsides protected in time of war lobbied Ottawa for the bases to be put back into other parts of Canada to create better economies there.

Lobbyists? Do you have any evidence that it was "lobbyists" that did this?

The NOW province of Newfoundland and Labrador (we weren't a province back in wartime) was used and abused in war,

How was it abused, and by whom? If you want bases scattered around for no other purpose than creating jobs, then surely the wartime military presence in the province, Canadian and American, doesn't count as "abuse", does it?

The only difference in peace time is that our natural and human resources are being pillaged and used for economies in the rest of Canada and the world and not Newfoundland and Labrador.

Which resources are being "pillaged"?

Is Newfoundland, then, by the same standard, "pillaging" Labrador, or other provinces of Canada, when resources are imported into Newfoundland?

Why or why not?

WJM said...

Why are you not lobbying for the 650 military jobs for Goose Bay?

How do you know I'm not? And it's not my job to keep Stephen Harper's and Gordon O'Connor's promises... That job belongs to Stephen Harper and Gordon O'Connor.

Are you more concerned about what you can garner personally for yourself by being quiet and acting counter to what the people want for your area?

How am I "acting counter"?

such as the resources that are going out of your area to be detained in Labrador to create vibrant economies in Labrador?

The resources that are "going out of Labrador" are almost entirely, with one exception, under the exclusive jurisdiction of the provincial government.

The problem with politicians and bureaucrats is that they are more concerned about amassing a fortune for themselves

People who want "fortunes" don't work for the government.

Anonymous said...

People who want to make fortunes do work for the government.

Anonymous said...

WJM you are not overtly lobbying for the 650 Military Personnel for Goose Bay, if you are doing so at all, it must be covertly.

All you do on this blog WJM is sweat the small stuff. Patriot's reason for this blog, I am sure, was for constructive criticisms that would move this place forward. You are always throwing cogs into the wheel with your childish stuff. Stop it please and do something that will move your community and ours forward. Thank you. Again don't sweat the small stuff.

Anonymous said...

I don't know why all these people keep jumping on WJM. I guess because the truth is hard to take and he looks at statements rationally, unlike most of the rest of you who jump on every little thing as an "insult" or an affront to the province. I think you are all just a bit paranoid.

Anonymous said...

No we are not at all being paranoid. We are just being smart for once in our lives. Now the ‘smart era’ is upon us and we have to act and act fast. By the way WJM is supposedly a Labradorian and he goes counter to everything people on this blog are trying to do to help out Labrador by lobbying for something good to happen there. WJM writes counter to everything good that is being written. When he saboages the blog in such a way, he is not helping Labrador, but instead hindering it. It appears to me that he wishes that nobody spoke out on this blog on what has happened to the resources of this provinces. Like I said prior WJM will counteract everything. It is sad to see such him sabotaging this blog in such a way.

Anon of January 14, 2007 3:50 PM if you care to peruse Patriots blogs and read all the threads, you will concur with me that WJM has sabotaged everything. You will concur, of course, that is if you are not WJM.

Anonymous said...

ANON 1. 14 . 07 IT APPEARS FROM YOUR SHABBY COMMENTS YOU ARE OVERWHELMED BY WJMS INSIGHT AND INTELLECT. YOU ARE UNABLE TO GIVE A CLEAR EXPLANATION AS TO WHY, ACCORDING TO YOU, " WJM WRITES TO COUNTER TO EVERYTHING GOOD THATS BEING WRITTEN" WHATS YOUR PROBLEM ANYWAY? ARE YOU SIMPLY JEALOUS OF THE FACT WJM IS ALWAYS A STEP AHEAD OF YOU AND ALWAYS KNOWS WHAT HE IS TALKING ABOUT? IF ALL ELSE FAILS WITH SOME OF YOU, YOU ACCUSE ( OR INSINUATE) WJM IS POSTING UNDER 'ANON". NOTHING COULD BE FURTHER FROM THE TRUTH. GUTLESS, HE IS NOT, CAN'T YOU TELL? GET OVER IT, ACCEPT THE FACT WJM HAS YOU OUTDONE.

Anonymous said...

TO: Anon who wrote January 14, 2007 6:19 PM

Anon I am neither overwhelmed by WJMs insight nor his intellect. I have seen neither on the threads that WJM has posted.

WJM counteracts everything that is written, it doesn't matter in which context or what it is about. That doesn't at all indicate to me any insight. All you have to do to confirm that my statement is true is go and read all the threads on Patriot's blog, then you will see immediately what I am referring to.

If somebody writes something in support of the province that doesn't specificly mention Labrador, WJM will counter that. If another writes a positive article on behalf of Labrador, then WJM will counter that. So in my estimation WJMs threads to this blog DO NOT show INSIGHT at all. His threads show that WJM is a very argumentative person. It appears to me that WJM is not at peace until he presents an argument against everything possible that can be written that supports the province of Newfoundland and Labrador getting ahead in Canada. I FEEL WJM EVEN ARGUES WITH HIMSELF WHEN HE IS ALONE.

There is nothing that WJM has ever written that indicates he knows what he is talking about. WJM might very well be an intelligent human being as you stated he is, I do not know what level of intelligence WJM possesses, since I have never tested WJM's IQ so I can't argue your statement. I do know though that WJM copies and pastes other posters statements made on this blog and then argues against them, after which WJM will make a statement of his own like NOPE or something else to the negative. Though I will accept and respect your opinion that WJM is an intelligent person, even though I only know this WJM personality from threading to Patriot's blog. To me WJM is just 3 initials backed up with NEGATIVE comments.

Anonymous said...

ANON 1/14/07 7:15 P.M. VERY INTERESTING COMMENTS!!! YOU MUST BE LEARNING SOMETHING FROM WJM.,WOULD'NT YOU KNOW, YOU ARE STARTING TO SOUND LIKE HIM!! AMAZING!!!!

WJM said...

By the way WJM is supposedly a Labradorian

What do you mean "supposedly"?

and he goes counter to everything people on this blog are trying to do to help out Labrador by lobbying for something good to happen there.

What are the people on this blog "lobbying" to do to "help" Labrador? I ha'nta seen it.

WJM writes counter to everything good that is being written.

What "good"?

When he saboages the blog in such a way,

What "sabotage"?

Like I said prior WJM will counteract everything.

I only counteract lies, myths, and Newfoundland hypocrisy.

You will concur, of course, that is if you are not WJM.

I don't post anonymously.

If Myles would require logins for posting, you'd know that.

WJM said...

WJM counteracts everything that is written,

If you want a Happy AgreementFest, go join the Newfoundland Separatist League where you have to sign an agreement to never disagree with the Newfoundland separatist orthodoxy.

it doesn't matter in which context or what it is about.

The only context where I disagree is when something is posted that is wrong.

If another writes a positive article on behalf of Labrador, then WJM will counter that.

Would you care to provide an example of this? Thanks!

His threads show that WJM is a very argumentative person.

Yip! Why is that a vice for me, when the Newfoundland separatists think it is such a virtue in Danny Williams or Sue Kelland Dyer?

I FEEL WJM EVEN ARGUES WITH HIMSELF WHEN HE IS ALONE.

Absolutely! You should always question your own perspectives rather than fall into tunnel vision.

To me WJM is just 3 initials backed up with NEGATIVE comments.

It would be a very boring world if people's blogs and discussion threads consisted of nothing but "I agree".

Have you ever noticed how letters pages in the papers are taken up with people who disagree with, or question the facts presented in, previous articles and opinion pieces?

Does that bother you, too?

Anonymous said...

But your threads WJM do not consist of any I AGREE. Your threads WJM always consist of I DON'T AGREE.

Anonymous said...

That speaks to the asinine and ultimately mean spirited nature of this circus. Take it up with Higgins and his acene scarred phalatiator.

Anonymous said...

Ottawa is speaking, listen up now.

Anonymous said...

I just read an informative article on how British Columbian businesses have benefited greatly from the Prime Minister's Team Canada missions to Asia. These trade missions have rejuvenated BCs economy over the past 20 years. The trade missions not only brought an influx of immigrants but many Asian businesses have located there as well. There have been billions and billions of dollars infused into BCs economy all attributed to the Trade Missions. I know Canada directed a lot of its attention on the end of the Hong Kong lease with Britain in 1997, but it also directed a lot of attention on the booming development in China. My question is why can't Canada focus this type of attention on the province of Newfoundland and Labrador?

WJM said...

Your threads WJM always consist of I DON'T AGREE.

And? Assuming for the sake of argument that that's true, how is that problematic?

WJM said...

My question is why can't Canada focus this type of attention on the province of Newfoundland and Labrador?

Possibly because Newfoundland and Labrador is not a foreign country?

Anonymous said...

Yesterday I wrote the statements in a paragraph below in QUOTES. Your REPLY back to me WJM was the thread of January 15, 2007 11:07 PM. YOUR ANSWER: "POSSIBLY BECAUSE NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR IS NOT A FOREIGN COUNTRY."

My question on your answer: "I thought Newfoundland and Labrador was still a province of Canada and not a foreign country, no different than British Columbia; why WJM would you say that Newfoundland and Labrador is not a foreign country?

The attention I was seeking for Newfoundland and Labrador WJM is no different than the attention Canada focused on British Columbia with its attempt to bring vibrant economies to British Columbia, though Canada's efforts of formulating the Prime Minister's Trade Missions in taking these trade missions to Hong Kong and China, primarily to attract immigrants and business from these countries for to build vibrant economies in British Columbia. Canada succeeded with these missions getting billions of dollars worth of business for BC and thousands of immigrants who have contributed vastly to BC's economy and its population base. The question I asked in that thread was: Why can't Canada do likewise for the province of Newfoundland and Labrador? If it could be done for British Columbia, it can be done for resource rich Newfoundland and Labrador.



MY QUOTE of January 15, 2007 6:51 PM QUOTE I just read an informative article on how British Columbian businesses have benefited greatly from the Prime Minister's Team Canada missions to Asia. These trade missions have rejuvenated BCs economy over the past 20 years. The trade missions not only brought an influx of immigrants but many Asian businesses have located there as well. There have been billions and billions of dollars infused into BCs economy all attributed to the Trade Missions. I know Canada directed a lot of its attention on the end of the Hong Kong lease with Britain in 1997, but it also directed a lot of attention on the booming development in China. My question is why can't Canada focus this type of attention on the province of Newfoundland and Labrador? UNQUOTE

Anonymous said...

^^^ This is so asinine it makes my head hurt

Anonymous said...

To: You who threaded on January 16, 2007 12:15 PM QUOTE ^^^ This is so asinine it makes my head hurt UNQUOTE



What is so asinine about wanting for resource-rich Newfoundland and Labrador, a province of Canada, what is right for resource rich British Columbia? Newfoundland and Labrador is the Eastern Bookend, just as British Columbia is the Western Bookend of Canada. Newfoundland and Labrador is situated on the busy Atlantic Ocean shipping lanes. I am just asking for something good to happen for the inhabitants of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; and for Canada to make an effort for that something good to occur, just like it did for British Columbia. We want to continue living here.

By the way your thread does not make any sense at all. And your frequent use of the word asinine all through this blog never seems to fit properly in your very short threads. I am wondering if you really know the definition of that word. I don't think so. Oh yes, I love beautiful thriving British Columbia, it certainly has very nice people and very lovely sceneries and it sure has a vibrant economies that we should all be envying.

NL-ExPatriate said...

The truth of the matter is Ottawa doesn't think of NL as a province. They think of all of the Atlantic provinces as the Atlantic region with Halifax as it's capital.

Thats why you will hear so many buracrats and Poll iticians refer to the federation as being from Vancouver to halifax. We are being lumped in with NS, NB, and PEI as a region. You will even see it on the Fed govts web site or in the present system of representation for the Senate and Supreme court of Canada we are considered to be apart of the Atlantic region and if HAlifax gets federal funding presence we are considered to be the apart of the benefactor region.

I guess it is Ontario's way of justifying their empirical hold on the rest of the provinces.

WJM said...

why WJM would you say that Newfoundland and Labrador is not a foreign country?

Because it would explain why "Canada" is not leading trade missions to Newfoundland and Labrador.

The attention I was seeking for Newfoundland and Labrador WJM is no different than the attention Canada focused on British Columbia with its attempt to bring vibrant economies to British Columbia, though Canada's efforts of formulating the Prime Minister's Trade Missions in taking these trade missions to Hong Kong and China, primarily to attract immigrants and business from these countries for to build vibrant economies in British Columbia.

Which countries do you propose would make a good target for such an overseas mission, then, "to build vibrant economies" in Newfoundland and Labrador? And why would anyone want to invest in a province that has Danny Williams, one of the most anti-business political leaders in the country, in charge of it?

Why can't Canada do likewise for the province of Newfoundland and Labrador? If it could be done for British Columbia, it can be done for resource rich Newfoundland and Labrador.

How is Newfoundland and Labrador any more "resource rich" than any other province of Canada, with the exception of PEI and arguably the other two Maritimes? And what is the relevance of being "resource rich" in the context of foreign trade?

WJM said...

What is so asinine about wanting for resource-rich Newfoundland and Labrador, a province of Canada, what is right for resource rich British Columbia?

How is NL any more resource rich than other provinces? What advantage does this convey?

Newfoundland and Labrador is the Eastern Bookend, just as British Columbia is the Western Bookend of Canada. Newfoundland and Labrador is situated on the busy Atlantic Ocean shipping lanes.

So are four other provinces. What's your point?

I am just asking for something good to happen for the inhabitants of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; and for Canada to make an effort for that something good to occur, just like it did for British Columbia. We want to continue living here.

Go to the ACOA website, or the provincial press release archive, and look at all the Atlantic-specific trade missions that provincial governments have been involved in. And ask the provincial government what those missions have accomplished.

Anonymous said...

WJM - What and Where are the resources in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. I know that the province of Newfoundland and Labrador has FISH, OIL, MINERALS AND HYDROELECTRIC ENERGY. In your next thread would you please list the other 3 Atlantic provinces resources. Also I would like you to itemize the Federal government jobs and Military bases that are present in the other 3 provinces and also give an itemize list of the Federal jobs and Military bases present in Newfoundland and Labrador. I will look forward to a list from you comparing all 4 Atlantic Provinces. Since you work with the Government in Ottawa, it should be easy for you to come up with a list of all the information required. That is the only way this argument can be solved. I can't wait, maybe then we will get somewhere with this argument.

Anonymous said...

UBC to play part in Year of the Asia Pacific
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Prime Minister Jean Chretien announced while in Vancouver last week that 1997 will be Canada's Year of the Asia Pacific.
The announcement was made at Canada Place to a room filled with UBC students, faculty and administators, as well as business leaders, MPs and cabinet ministers. UBC President David Strangway introduced the prime minister.

The year will culminate in November 1997 when Vancouver plays host to the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation meeting, APEC '97.

Chretien was on his way to APEC '96 in Manila, where he will meet with representatives of 18 other Pacific Rim economies to plan trade and economic development in the region.

"The future of Canada will depend a great deal on our presence in the Pacific, and the gateway to the Pacific is B.C. We are very happy with the dynamism of the business community and the university community who are helping to prepare the province and the rest of Canada to be the leaders of the Pacific," Chretien said.

This January, one of the first formal events of Canada's Year of the Asia Pacific will take place at UBC as the university co-hosts the Asia Pacific Parliamentary Forum.

The forum brings together distinguished legislators from more than 20 Pacific Rim nations to discuss matters of mutual concern and interest. It will be the first time the forum is held in Canada.

Canada was a founding member of the forum, which was established in Tokyo in 1993.

Among its goals are: understanding policy concerns, interests and experiences; examining political, social and cultural developments; encouraging and promoting regional co-operation; and encouraging regional cohesion, understanding and co-operation.

Also in January, Strangway has been asked to join the prime minister and Team Canada on a trade mission to Thailand, South Korea and the Philippines. Strangway has been a member of the team on previous missions to Asia.

Strangway said these activities are very much in keeping with the university's long-standing interest in the Asia Pacific. UBC has a vital role in developing relationships and increasing knowledge about the region.

"Knowledge is a great builder of bridges across regions. The more we understand about other areas, the more we can work together -- and that benefits each of us," Strangway said.

"This is why links with Asia Pacific are important not only to UBC and British Columbia, but to all of Canada. New knowledge means new opportunities--and new opportunities mean employment for young people and prosperity throughout our society."

About 80 UBC students, representing different constituencies across campus and all sharing an interest in the Pacific Rim, were on hand for the prime minister's announcement.

Gisèle Yasmeen, speaking on the students' behalf, thanked the prime minister for sharing his vision of Canada's role in the Pacific Century.

Yasmeen, who recently completed work on a PhD in the Geography Dept., studied urbanization, food systems and gender in Southeast Asia. She was also an intern at the Asia Pacific Foundation's APEC Study Centre.

"Those of us who work in the Asia Pacific region are thrilled with this announcement," she said.

Anonymous said...

I can direct you to many articles like the one above archived on the internet that shows the attention focused on the Asia-Pacific route on behalf of the province of British Columbia. Please do not get me wrong, I am very happy for beautiful British Columbia, but I think the same type of focus should be lavished on a have-not resource rich province like Newfoundland and Labrador. There is enough room in the developing countries of India and China to accommodate all of Canada's production. Besides the focus for Newfoundland and Labrador could be with the European Union countries. It doesn't matter to me where Canada will focus it efforts for economic development for this province, all that matters to me is that it does.

WJM said...

WJM - What and Where are the resources in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

I already noted that PEI doesn't have much in the way of non-agricultural terrestrial natural resources. It does have fisheries, you might have noticed.

NB and NS both have significant forest sectors. (PEI much less so.) Still, PEI and NS have EXPORTED pulp wood to Nfld.

NB has base metal and potash mines, as well as numerous industrial mineral producers.

Nova Scotia, you might have noticed, has an offshore petroleum industry.

I know that the province of Newfoundland and Labrador has FISH, OIL, MINERALS AND HYDROELECTRIC ENERGY.

All three Maritime provinces have fish; NS and NB have minerals; NS has offshore petroleum.

Also I would like you to itemize the Federal government jobs and Military bases that are present in the other 3 provinces

There are no bases in PEI. What's the relevance?

You want me to itemize thousands of jobs? Why? What's the relevance, other than to note that, JUST like Newfoundland and Labrador, those three provinces also have a larger share of the federal civil service than they do of the national population?

and also give an itemize list of the Federal jobs and Military bases present in Newfoundland and Labrador.

What does that have to do with anything?

Anonymous said...

*.* if you listed the Federal jobs for all the provinces, and then did the ratio of how Newfoundland and Labrador Federal jobs compare to every other province, you would see our per centage of Federal jobs is far less than the other provinces. Of course to do that would call your bluff. How stupid of me to ask you?


Patriot this *.* is so anti-Newfoundland and Labrador as a unit, this personality will argue on Ottawa's behalf until his death. In his mind Ottawa can do no harm, but I guess when your pay cheque comes from Ottawa and that is the reason you are getting a pay cheque in the first place to argue against Newfoundland and Labrador, well then he has no other choice, but to argue or give up his pay cheque. My God what an awful country we are living in indeed to cause such dissention.

WJM said...

if you listed the Federal jobs for all the provinces, and then did the ratio of how Newfoundland and Labrador Federal jobs compare to every other province, you would see our per centage of Federal jobs is far less than the other provinces.

NO, YOU WOULD NOT.

Of course to do that would call your bluff. How stupid of me to ask you?

Bluff called.

Here are the number of federal civil servants per-capita (jobs/100 population) for all provinces and for Canada as a whole.

NL is higher than the all-Canada average, and fourth among the provinces:

NS 3.27
PE 2.41
NB 1.99
NL 1.75
MB 1.59
ON 1.42
Canada 1.36
QC 1.10
BC 1.08
AB 1.06
SK 1.05


Measured another way, NL with 1.6% of the Canadian population, has 1.9% of the federal civil service jobs.

You're welcome.

Anonymous said...

You actually think that "Ottawa" is paying WJM or anyone else to go onto blogs and be against Newfoundland??

When did your already deep paranoia as a province reach such epic proportions??? Or maybe it's ego?

Anonymous said...

Nothing surprises me about Ottawa. How soon you forgot the Sponsorship Program in Quebec where a billion got wasted. How short is your memory?

Please answer the question I just posed to you. I am sure you will not.

Anonymous said...

It is quite plain to see that Nova SCotia at 3.27 is the center of the Atlantic Region universe. PEI is doing wonderful with 2.41 and New Brunswick at 1.99 is not bad. And Newfoundland and Labrador at 1.75 is the worst of the lot, despite Newfoundland and Labrador offshore Oil Production is carrying the region economically that is according to a Bank of Montreal statement a couple of weeks ago.

Anonymous said...

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Newfoundland and Labrador export growth to lead country, says EDC

ST. JOHN'S, May 10, 2006 -- The value of Newfoundland and Labrador's exports will lead the country with strong growth of 7 per cent in 2006 before leaping to 10 per cent in 2007, according to a provincial export outlook by Export Development Canada (EDC).

Newfoundland and Labrador's exports are driven primarily by the energy sector, which accounts for 68.2 per cent of the province's goods and services shipped abroad, and the industrial goods sector (22.6 per cent).

"Given the continued high price of oil, it comes as no surprise that Newfoundland and Labrador will be among the provincial leaders in energy export growth," said Stephen Poloz, Senior Vice-President of Corporate Affairs and Chief Economist. "But it is the significant growth in the province's second largest sector, industrial goods, that has tipped the scales of Newfoundland and Labrador towards the top of the Canadian export leaderboard ."

The oil and gas production companies in the province were behind the province's strong 13.5 per cent export growth in 2005. White Rose continues to ramp up production and should hit full output in the second half of this year. Hibernia had another great year in 2005 and is likely to see output rise through 2007. Boosted by White Rose, total crude production is forecast to rise from 111mn barrels in 2005 to over 120mn barrels in 2006. Production at Terra Nova has had its challenges and remains a forecast risk in 2006 but as these problems are overcome they will add to output next year. Together, international energy exports are expected to rise 9 per cent in 2006 and a further 13 per cent in 2007.

Iron ore dominates the province's industrial goods exports, accounting for 98 per cent of the sector's total export value. Iron ore exports rose a remarkable 94 cent in 2005 on a combination of higher prices and production. Behind the rapid price increase is China's 25 per cent increase in steel production in 2005. China's output of 349mn tons last year was more than the US, Japan, South Korea and Russia combined. Higher prices along with a slight increase in volumes in 2006 and a steady outlook for 2007 suggest iron ore export growth of 21 per cent and 2 per cent, respectively.

Nationally, Canadian real GDP growth is forecast to remain stable at 3.0 per cent in 2006 and 2.7 per cent in 2007. Canadian export volumes are forecast to grow by 3 per cent in 2006, up slightly from 2 per cent in 2005. Internationally, EDC is forecasting 4.3 per cent global economic growth in 2006 and 4.1 per cent growth in 2007, down from 4.5 in 2005. The continued healthy performance remains ahead of the historical long term average. EDC's Global Export Forecast is available at http://www.edc.ca/docs/ereports/gef/EFindex_e.htm.

Export Development Canada (EDC) is Canada's export credit agency, offering innovative commercial solutions to help Canadian exporters and investors expand their international business. EDC's knowledge and partnerships are used by 7,000 Canadian companies and their global customers in up to 200 markets worldwide each year. EDC is financially self-sustaining and is a recognized leader in financial reporting, economic analysis and human resource management.


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Media contact:
Phil Taylor
EDC Public Affairs
(613) 598-2904
ptaylor@edc.ca






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Date published: 2006-05-10 Important Notices

WJM said...

It is quite plain to see that Nova SCotia at 3.27 is the center of the Atlantic Region universe. PEI is doing wonderful with 2.41 and New Brunswick at 1.99 is not bad. And Newfoundland and Labrador at 1.75 is the worst of the lot,

And all four are still well above the other six provinces or the national average.

NL has MORE civil servants, per capita, than the national average, and than all but three provinces... NOT FEWER.

Anyone who says otherwise is a liar.

despite Newfoundland and Labrador offshore Oil Production is carrying the region economically

How does that mean that there should be more federal jobs? What's the connection?

Anonymous said...

If the province of Newfoundland and Labrador is well above the national average except for 3 provinces, these Federal Civil Servants are not very obvious. I have no idea where these people are hiding, as they aren't very evident.

WJM said...

I have no idea where these people are hiding, as they aren't very evident.

St. John's.

The St. John's metropolitan area has the fourth-highest percentage of federal civil servants of any metro area in Canada, after Ottawa, Halifax, and Victoria.

Anonymous said...

With government statistics there are lies, damn lies and statistics.

WJM said...

With ANY statistics, that's the case.

How, in the present case, are there any "lies"? Please explain.

Thank you.

Anonymous said...

Whenever I have a need to contact a Federal Regional Office I find that it is usually Halifax, Nova Scotia or Moncton, New Brunswick that I reach. Since Nova Scotia and New Brunswick have all of the Federal Regional offices for the Atlantic Region, except for Revenue Canada which is divided evenly between Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island. NL has one-half of the unit for that Department, with the other one-half of the unit in Prince Edward Island. The Federal Regional offices are generally always in the Capital cites of all the provinces or the larger urban area. I don't think it should be that way, Federal jobs should be distributed evenly throughout all of the provinces and throughout all of the regions of the provinces, both rural and urban, but one has to question Ottawa about their reasoning for structuring the way that these jobs are distributed. I am personally wondering why Nova Scotia and New Brunswick have many Federal Regional Offices, while Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island have one-half of a unit each. There seems to be no fairness to that system.

WJM said...

The Federal Regional offices are generally always in the Capital cites of all the provinces or the larger urban area. I don't think it should be that way, Federal jobs should be distributed evenly throughout all of the provinces and throughout all of the regions of the provinces

Define "evenly".

Thank you.

Anonymous said...

By evenly I mean the jobs should be placed not only in urban areas but rural areas of the provinces as well. Any Federal Regional office that I have ever contacted has been located in a capital city. If there are any Federal Regional Offices located in any of the rural areas that you know of WJM, maybe you can give me a itemize list of them in your next thread to this blog.